Read Bushwhackers: The Civil War in North Carolina: The Mountains by William R. Trotter Online

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Bushwhackers recounts hundreds of incidents that brought the Civil War home to the mountains of the Old North State. Some are violent, some humorous; some are heroic, some shameful. From the opening shots of the war to the vicious acts of vengeance that continued for months and even years after the war ended, Bushwhackers relates the tragic and rarely told tale of how theBushwhackers recounts hundreds of incidents that brought the Civil War home to the mountains of the Old North State. Some are violent, some humorous; some are heroic, some shameful. From the opening shots of the war to the vicious acts of vengeance that continued for months and even years after the war ended, Bushwhackers relates the tragic and rarely told tale of how the Civil War was fought among the proud mountain people of North Carolina....

Title : Bushwhackers: The Civil War in North Carolina: The Mountains
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780895870872
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 338 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Bushwhackers: The Civil War in North Carolina: The Mountains Reviews

  • Loraine
    2018-10-04 20:26

    William Trotter has written a memorable regional civil war history of the mountain people of North Carolina. He has a beautiful style of writing, with which he invites the reader into a living past fraught with existential events. Cherokee lived in those Appalachian mountains, as did self-sufficient mountaineers, whose forebearers first settled the coves and ridges as a result of service in the Revolutionary War or who migrated into the mountains from out of Pennsylvania in later years. The truth of the matter in 1861 was that the hill people were anti-secession Unionists. Trotter writes, "Historically speaking,many of the violent men who roamed the mountains were anonymous. they were known to those who sympathized with their allegiances, and in many cases they were known to their victims and their victims' families. But most of the violence happened to people who had neither the education nor the inclination to leave detailed written accounts, and by the time regional historians began writing down the orally preserved stories of wartime events--not until the early 20th century, in many cases--a great deal of information was lost forever, or had become smudged by time and countless retellings." (p. 147) But tell the story, he does. I determined to read Bushwhackers . . .after I read Cold Mountain and discovered that Frazier had used Trotter's history as a resource. What a resource! And what dreadful, cold-hearted times, especially for the outliers (deserters) who only wanted to get home to tend their land and families. Given that we are commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I recommend this book. And given that in the run-up to Barack Obama's re-election it often seemed to me that the outcome of the Civil War was being re-litigated by some, I recommend this book.

  • Edward
    2018-10-19 23:17

    William Trotter's trilogy on the Civil War in North Carolina is a fine series that both serious students of the Civil War and casual readers will enjoy. Trotter is a novelist as well as an historian, and his writing is entertaining and well as informational. As a Southerner, Trotter has a very good feel for hist portrayal of the South, and yet he does not whitewash anything. He tells the good, the bad, and the ugly. I was ridiculed on a Civil War Reenactor's forum because I cited "Bushwackers". I had dared criticize the Confederacy, and some of my fellow reenactors sneered that this book must be one of Trotter's works of fiction. But when I countered with supporting sources such as the renowned historian John G. Barrett, there was sudden silence from the peanut gallery. Trotter may not be 100 percent correct. (Who is?) But when I cross checked several dozen of his references, I did not find a single error in context or data. His citations were accurate. I highly recommend "Bushwackers" as well the other two books in the trilogy to anyone interested in Civil War or North Carolina history.

  • David Ward
    2018-10-08 00:25

    Bushwhackers: The Civil War in North Carolina: The Mountains by William R. Trotter (John F. Blair Publishers 1988) (973.74756). This is part of a nonfictional trilogy on the Civil War from William R. Trotter. This volume details the movements and skirmishes along the North Carolina highlands and contains a fine retelling of how “Bloody Madison” earned its name when the Madison County Confederate forces executed thirteen prisoners of war or Union sympathizers from the remote Shelton Laurel region of Madison County who supported the Union. My sympathies (and my forebears) lie with the Confederates, but this is a shameful episode. My rating: 7.5/10, finished 3/16/15.

  • Victor Davis
    2018-09-19 00:09

    There are maybe 3 or 4 chapters worth reading in this book. My favorites were those detailing some of the half-legendary "mountain lore" raiding and getaway stories. I am especially interested in JV Hadley and Albert D Richardson, two (separate) detailed accounts of northerners who escaped confederate prisons and made their way to friendly territory in Knoxville. There were so many Unionists in North Carolina they'd formed an "Underground Railway" for escaped prisoners.Most of this book though is a recap of the war in the mountains: Thomas' Legion, Burnside, Stoneman's Raid, etc.

  • Greg Parrott
    2018-10-17 18:19

    Volume 2 of the Trotter series... this one on the war in the mountain region. I have always assumed that NC was an all-in Confederate state, but the more I read the more Union sympathizers I see. Don't get me wrong; slavery of any kind, now, then, ancient times is wrong. But as I've started digging into the history, the more I find out that things aren't as they seem or have been told very one-sided. I recommend this book and the previous volume to any who live in the Old North State and learn about our not so distant past. Ready to tackle the Coastal Plains volume now.

  • Robert
    2018-10-14 18:58

    I got this book originally from a bibliography at the end of Sharon McCrumb's Ghost Riders. This is part of a three volume work by William Trotter detailing the Civil War in North Carolina. This particular volume covers the war in the mountains in the western part of the state. A lot of the anecdotal material here is reflected in the Cold Mountain movie and the book by Charles Frazier. Also, much of the material about William Thomas and the Cherokees forms a foundation for Charles Frazier's book Thirteen Moons.

  • Charles Cummings
    2018-09-22 00:26

    William Trotter's third book on NC in the ACW (although it was the first one published) reviews the war in the mountains (western) of NC. The mountains had the highest rates of unionism in the state. This, along with other issues, led to partisan attacks of a very brutal nature, including non-combatants. Interestingly, many Unionist from this part of the state would take the journey to eastern TN or KY to sign up with the Union. Again, Trotter's writing on the subject is excellent.

  • Hunter Johnson
    2018-10-09 00:19

    Bushwhackers: The Civil War in North Carolina - The Mountains by William R. Trotter. The middle volume of a non-fiction trilogy, it stands perfectly well on its own. An excellent look at the personal effects of the American Civil War.

  • Susan
    2018-09-22 18:23

    So far a very accurate and detailed account of Bushwhackers in the North Carolina mountains....

  • Ed
    2018-10-17 18:02

    Rivetting tales of the Civil War in the mountains of North Carolina.