Read Understanding John Dewey: Nature and Cooperative Intelligence by James Campbell Lewis Online

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"This beautifully written work is the best general introduction to Dewey's philosophy. The exposition is greatly enriched by Campbell's provision of the historical context of Dewey's aims and enquiries." -- James Gouinlock Emory University"Understanding John Dewey will be as useful to those coming to Dewey for the first time as to Dewey specialists. Few scholars combine as"This beautifully written work is the best general introduction to Dewey's philosophy. The exposition is greatly enriched by Campbell's provision of the historical context of Dewey's aims and enquiries." -- James Gouinlock Emory University"Understanding John Dewey will be as useful to those coming to Dewey for the first time as to Dewey specialists. Few scholars combine as well as Campbell does deep knowledge of American intellectual history and skill in philosophical analysis." -- Peter H. Hare Editor, Transactions of the Peirce Society"A book not merely readable but elegant and lucid, not merely adequate but exemplary in its scholarship. Campbell's exposition is a skillfully crafted matrix in which Dewey's own words achieve a momentum and clarity seldom achieved in their original settings, while a chorus, composed mostly of Dewey's contemporaries, provide illuminating commentary from Campbell's footnotes." -- International Studies in Philosophy...

Title : Understanding John Dewey: Nature and Cooperative Intelligence
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ISBN : 9780812692853
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 324 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Understanding John Dewey: Nature and Cooperative Intelligence Reviews

  • se lee
    2018-11-01 11:48

    Popular passagesWithin the flickering inconsequential acts of separate selves dwells a sense of the whole which claims and dignifies them. In its presence we put off mortality and live in the universal. The life of the community in which we live and have our being is the fit symbol of this relationship. - Page 280Appears in 91 books from 1921-2007Any idea upon which we can ride, so to speak; any idea that will carry us prosperously from any one part of our experience to any other part, linking things satisfactorily, working securely, simplifying, saving labor; is true for just so much, true in so far forth, true instrumentally. This is the "instrumental... - Page 18Appears in 166 books from 1907-2008But the sense of divisions and separations that were, I suppose, borne in upon me as a consequence of a heritage of New England culture, divisions by way of isolation of self from the world, of soul from body, of nature from God... - Page 11Appears in 50 books from 1934-2007Inquiry is the controlled or directed transformation of an indeterminate situation into one that is so determinate in its constituent distinctions and relations as to convert the elements of the original situation into a unified whole. - Page 47Appears in 207 books from 1892-2007Like a bird's life, it seems to be made of an alternation of flights and perchings. The rhythm of language expresses this, where every thought is expressed in a sentence, and every sentence closed by a period. The resting-places are usually occupied by sensorial imaginations of some sort... - Page 71Appears in 139 books from 1876-2007To declare something satisfactory is to assert that it meets specifiable conditions. It is, in effect, a judgment that the thing "will do." It involves a prediction: it contemplates a future in which the thing will continue to serve; it will do. It asserts a consequence the thing will actively institute ; it will do. That it is satisfying is the content of a proposition of fact; that it is satisfactory is a judgment, an estimate, an appraisal. It denotes an attitude to be taken, that of striving... - Page 130Appears in 64 books from 1920-2006In language and imagination we rehearse the responses of others just as we dramatically enact other consequences. We foreknow how others will act, and the foreknowledge is the beginning of judgment passed on action. We know with them ; there is conscience. An assembly is formed within our breast which discusses and appraises proposed and performed acts. The community without becomes a forum and tribunal within, a judgmentseat of charges, assessments and exculpations. - Page 114Appears in 30 books from 1922-2007The things in civilization we most prize are not of ourselves. They exist by grace of the doings and sufferings of the continuous human community in which we are a link. Ours is the responsibility of conserving, transmitting, rectifying, and expanding the heritage of values we have received that those who come after us may receive it more solid and secure, more widely accessible and more generously shared than we have received it. - Page 280Appears in 126 books from 1934-2008Active, persistent, and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds that support it, and the further conclusions to which it tends, constitutes reflective thought. - Page 57Appears in 294 books from 1910-2008Government, business, art, religion, all social institutions have a meaning, a purpose. That purpose is to set free and to develop the capacities of human individuals without respect to race, sex, class or economic status. - Page 185Appears in 91 books from 1900-2007

  • Frank Spencer
    2018-10-18 10:49

    This book pays off on the promise of the title. Your understanding of Dewey, who I find difficult to read, is increased by reading the book. Dewey's idea of social reconstruction sounds a lot like Professional Learning Communities, which are really popular in education these days (80 years after Dewey). The similarity of Dewey's ideas to those of Darwin and of Mead is outlined here. I found his definition of God (which he later gave up on, I guess) interesting: it was "the unity of all ideal ends arousing us to desire and actions." Campbell sets up Dewey's thought by describing the overall American thought patterns of the time, which is interesting and helpful.