Read Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to his Mother by Donald Sturrock Online

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'Dear Mama, I am having a lovely time here. We play football every day here. The beds have no springs...' So begins the first letter that nine-year-old Roals Dahl penned to his mother, Sofie Magdalene, under the watchful eye of his boarding -school headmaster. For most of his life, Roald Dahl would continue to write weekly letters to his mother, chronicling his adventures,'Dear Mama, I am having a lovely time here. We play football every day here. The beds have no springs...' So begins the first letter that nine-year-old Roals Dahl penned to his mother, Sofie Magdalene, under the watchful eye of his boarding -school headmaster. For most of his life, Roald Dahl would continue to write weekly letters to his mother, chronicling his adventures, frustrations and opinions, from the delights of his childhood to the excitements of flying as a second world war fighter pilot and the thrill of meeting top politicians and film stars during his time as a diplomat and spy in Washington. And, unbeknown to Roald, his mother lovingly kept every single one of them.Sofie was, in many ways, Roald's first reader. It was she who encouraged him to tell stories and nourished his desire to fabricate, exaggerate and entertain. Reading these letters, you can see Roald practising his craft, developing the dark sense of humour and fantastical imagination that would later produce such timeless tales as The BFG, Matilda, Fantastic Mr Fox and The Witches. The letters in Love From Boy are littered with Jokes and madcap observations; sometimes serious, sometimes tender, and often outrageous. To eavesdrop on a son's letters to his mother is to witness Roald Dahl turning from a boy to man, and finally becoming a writer....

Title : Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to his Mother
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781444786279
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to his Mother Reviews

  • Bettie☯
    2018-11-15 17:49

    BOTWhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07ctt0sDescription: n the centenary year of his birth, Roald Dahl's letters to his mother are newly collected by Donald Sturrock and abridged for radio by Katrin Williams. The author's words to Sofie Magdalene spanned decades..Episode 1: At Repton School in the 1930's he reported back on jolly japes, and asked 'Mama' to ask his sister to feed his mouse.. ["our house colours are black and blue"]Episode 2: With Royal Shell he enjoyed postings to exotic places and reported back on mambas, giraffes, and the occasional flying fish. All these appealed to the writer in him.Episode 3: War breaks out and he is posted to the Middle East. He learns to fly, has aero-nautical adventures, before the crash that will change his life..Episode 4: In America during the war, he pens a certain story called 'Gremlins', about the little creatures that run amok over all things mechanical. This comes to the notice of Walt Disney.Episode 5: The author describes marriage to Patricia Neal, then family tragedy. And there's a final tribute to Sofie Magdalene ("Dear Mama.."), receiver of hundreds and hundreds of his missives from the age of nine..

  • Laura
    2018-11-15 20:12

    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the Week:In the centenary year of his birth, Roald Dahl's letters to his mother are newly collected by Donald Sturrock and abridged for radio by Katrin Williams. The author's words to Sofie Magdalene spanned decades..1/5: At Repton School in the 1930's he reported back on jolly japes, and asked 'Mama' to ask his sister to feed his mouse.2/5: With Royal Shell he enjoyed postings to exotic places and reported back on mambas, giraffes, and the occasional flying fish. All these appealed to the writer in him.3/5: War breaks out and he is posted to the Middle East. He learns to fly, has aero-nautical adventures, before the crash that will change his life.4/5: In America during the war, he pens a certain story called 'Gremlins', about the little creatures that run amok over all things mechanical. This comes to the notice of Walt Disney.5/5: The author describes marriage to Patricia Neal, then family tragedy. And there's a final tribute to Sofie Magdalene ("Dear Mama.."), receiver of hundreds and hundreds of his missives from the age of nine.Readers Rory Kinnear and Donald SturrockProducer Duncan Minshull.http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07ctt0s

  • Quirkyreader
    2018-12-12 20:03

    I received this from Penguin as an ARC. This book gives a good insight to what Dahl's life was like growing up and what finally influenced him to become a writer. I enjoy all of his writing, both children and adult stories. Reading this epistle gives me even more appreciation to his stories.There aren't too many vulgar words, so this book can be read aloud to children with the fbombs and sbombs changed to something else. It is a wonderful collection that will go well on the shelf with the other Dahl stories.

  • Jessica White
    2018-11-30 13:49

    Reading these letters was like looking into the mastermind behind one of the world's greatest children's authors. Roald Dahl is widely recognized as the author Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, The BFG, and Matilda. But what many people don't know is the life he had before he put pen to paper. It all started in 1925, when he was nine years old. He began writing letters to his mother from boarding school. His over-imaginative mind was already churning when he told her stories about his playmates. Throughout the years, he matures greatly. Seeing that first letter and comparing it with on of his last letters in 1965 shows immense change. Reading his stories of being in the R.A.F. army gave insight to what turned him into the man he became. The letters he sent home to his mother were often full of adventures. He traveled from Norway to England to Africa and eventually to the states. He spent many dinners with President Roosevelt. Walt Disney approached him with movie ideas. He even passed time with his longtime hero Ernest Hemingway.These letters weren't just letters, they were the beginning of his storytelling life. He wrote for the New York Times, Reader's Digest, and a slew of others. It wasn't until he was well into his 30's, married, and with children before he found the inspiration for his first children's book. I loved reading this and I highly suggest Love From Boy to anyone who is a fan of Roald Dahl or is an avid children's book reader!This review and more can be found at A Reader's Diary!

  • JoLee
    2018-12-03 13:06

    Roald Dahl's autobiographical books,Boy: Tales of Childhood andGoing Solo, are my absolute favorite Roald Dahl books. So, when I heard about this new collection of letters set to be published in conjunction with Dahl's 100th birthday on September 13th, I knew I wanted to read it.Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to His Mother is, as the title indicates, a collection of letters that were written by the author to his mother. Dahl wrote to his mother consistently from the time he left for boarding school at age nine until her death four decades later. Assembled by Dahl's authorized biographer,Donald Sturrock, the letters offer a glimpse into the famous author's life and his relationship with his mother.Because I already was such a big fan of Dahl's autobiographies, I knew that he had lived a fascinating life. As one would expect with letters, some are more interesting than others. I had a hard time getting through the childhood letters because of the young writer's youth and the fact that he wasn't exactly honest about the rough life of boarding school. It was, however, interesting to read about how the young Dahl began to take an interest in things that I knew would interest him for his entire life (photography and sports). I expected the Africa letters to be a bit more interesting than they were (lots of alcohol and some stories about snakes). However, once the World War II started and Dahl signed up with the RAF the letters became much more fascinating to me. Even with the censors at work, it was interesting to read about Dahl's training, his love of flight, and his plane crash.The letters I enjoyed most were the ones that Dahl wrote to his mother while he was working in Washington, D.C. during the war. It was so interesting to hear about his work with famous people, such as the Roosevelts and Walt Disney. Also, during this time, Dahl really became serious about writing, and I liked reading about this transformation.Donald Sturrock's chapter introductions are every bit as interesting and informative as the letters themselves. Sturrock sets the stage well for each group of letters, putting them in context in terms of both world events and Dahl's personal life. Sturrock also identifies life events that influence Dahl's later writing, such as how boarding school informedMatilda and flyingJames and the Giant Peach.More than anything,Love from Boy made me want to rereadBoy: Tales of Childhood andGoing Solo. In fact, I convinced my book club that we should read them both for our September meeting in celebration of Roald Dahl's 100th birthday. Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to His Mother is out September 6th.Review copy from Penguin First to Read.

  • Zivile
    2018-12-10 16:13

    I received an early copy from Penguin's First Readers program.I didn't know much about Roald Dahl before, until recently I read my first book by him: "My Uncle Oswald", which was written at the end of his life, and it's a very sexualized story. Then I learnt he's the author of well known children books and I was very confused. Until I read this book. It's an unintended epistolary autography which turned out to be a more exciting biography of Dahl than it could ever be. The first letters are from his early school days, full of grammar mistakes but so cute to read. The story ends with the last letter to his mother before she died in 1962. So we are missing almost 20 years of his life but the letters give more than enough about his personality and what influenced him throughout the life. Now I understand better how such book like "My Uncle Oswald" was born.

  • Jade
    2018-11-16 17:01

    This is a collection of letters written from Roald Dahl to his mother, mainly from his school years until his early 50s. Each section includes an introduction by the author as to Roald's life at that time. The later letters are sparse and therefore do not have any link to his children's books, which he started in his mid forties.The disappointing part of this book is that these letters really could have been from any boy to his mother. I did get some good factual knowledge about Dahl along the way - I had no idea about his pilot history or link to Walt Disney - but kinda wish now that I'd just read his autobiography instead. Maybe this book is a good addition to someone who already has that better knowledge of Roald, and has a fans passion for more. I don't think this book gave me any impressive insight, because firstly there is no return correspondence from his mother (adding to the relationship dynamic), and secondly most of the time it is noted that Roald couldn't have written what he really wanted because 1. in school his letters where written under close scrutiny and 2. his war-time letters were also screened and checked for content. Because of this Roald comes across as quite arrogant and pompous in parts, with no true understanding of hardship and a reliance on material possessions; something that I do not believe to be the case in reality.My enjoyment of this book will in now way squash my utter awe and love of this legend of an author. I think if you want to know if you'll enjoy this or not, just ask yourself if you'd like to spend 5 hours reading someones post home - also bearing in mind what you can and wouldn't actually tell one of your parents, meaning that any juicy bits are not mentioned!

  • Nicole
    2018-11-13 11:59

    The review in the Times made the letters sound like they would be both entertaining and enlightening. They weren't either. Just skimmed along the surface of an upper class life at the end of empire. Perhaps his mother's letters would have been more interesting if saved. For a little book, this became a slog to get through

  • Yordan Dimov
    2018-11-16 14:11

    Издадени по случай 100-годишнината от рождението на Роалд Дал, писмата ни позволяват да видим как се заражда фантастичното въображение, създало едни от най-четените детски книги в света. Благодарение на достъпа, който е получил до архивите на Роалд Дал, официалният му биограф Доналд Стърок, успява да ни го покаже така, както малцина са го познавали преди.. чрез собствените му думи!Майсторски поднесена биография на много любим автор!

  • Olga Vannucci
    2018-12-05 12:13

    Fighter pilot, diplomat,Wrote his mother much chit chat.

  • Benedikte
    2018-11-25 18:48

    "Dear mama(...)I had a grand shit in a petrol tin this morning with 3 other blokes doing the same within a space of 4 yards. One of them suddenly leapt up, shrieking, 'Gor - a fuckin' scorpion's got me balls!"(brief geschreven in de woestijn, 26/04/1940)Roald Dahl was 9 toen hij voor het eerst een brief aan zijn moeder Sofie Magdalene richtte. Wat begon als een fait divers, groeide door de jaren uit tot een lijvige collectie brieven. Daarin vertelde Dahl keer op keer op een ongedwongen, spontane manier over de dingen die hij zag en beleefde. Sofie bewaarde alle documenten in bundels. Ze vormen de basis voor een gloednieuwe en bijzonder geanimeerde biografie over het leven van één van de beroemdste kinderauteurs aller tijden.Toegegeven: iets van Dahl "niet goed" vinden, is moeilijk. 's Mans oeuvre blaakt van inventiviteit en creativiteit, waardoor hij wereldberoemd werd. En dat vast ook nog decennia blijft. Deze inkijk in Dahls persoonlijke leven, van tiener tot volwassen man, is een spreekwoordelijke kers op de literaire taart. Als lezer kom je vooral te weten wie de man was, hoe hij tegen (banale en belangrijke) dingen aankeek en welke onwaarschijnlijke avonturen hij zelf beleefde.Neen, de 'doodgewone en fantasierijke' schooljongen Dahl is niet zomaar de auteur die iedereen kent. Hij was eigenlijk een halve Noor. Hij was ook gevechtspiloot tijdens de tweede oorlog. Hij overleefde een joekel van vliegtuigcrash. Hij werkte als geheim agent in opdracht van de overheid. Hij raakte bevriend met Walt Disney én Theodore Roosevelt. En hij was ook bijzonder zwak in... spelling.Al die elementen maken van 'Love from Boy' een leuk en onderhoudend naslagwerk, over een legende. En cours de route ontdek je ook dat Dahl vrij panisch bezig was met zijn eigen gezondheid en waarheid en werkelijkheid graag dooreen haspelde. Al zijn avonturen hebben pas jaren later het fundament gevormd voor de wereldberoemde kinderboeken. Wie graag een inkijk wil in de (prettige gestoorde) geest en de soms wat panische ziel van Brits-Scandinavische grootheid, moet dit boek ter hand nemen. Het verschaft luchtig leesplezier en afleiding op kritieke momenten. Het laat zich vlot lezen. Het ontspant, quoi... net zoals Dahls eigen boeken dat bij jong en oud npg steeds doen.

  • Caitlin
    2018-11-25 13:15

    Free book from Penguin First to Read in exchange for an honest review.A collection of the (mostly) weekly letters Dahl wrote to his mother, beginning when he was nine at boarding school, and continuing to not long before her death. Collected to tell the highlights of his life, these letters span the globe as well as the years, showing Dahl's development as a person and as a writer. Full of mentions of loved ones, dirty jokes, and amusing stories, the letters are only one side of his life--the mostly dressed up version. The narration provides the rest, showing his struggles at school, and a WWII fighter pilot, or work as a diplomat. In this book, readers will recognize places and people who came to be part of a beloved collection of children's stories.Though one-sided (Dahl didn't keep any of the letters his mother wrote him), with the narration this paints a pretty complete story of Dahl's life, divided up into chapters based on important events, with each letter marked with a key of his location. A map that shows his travels is also included, as well as plenty of pictures and a few scanned letters. Thankfully, the scanned letters are few and fairly short, the majority of the text typed (and corrected) versions, as Dahl's handwriting wasn't the best. It's an interesting look into his life, and an exploration of his development as a teller of stories--a path he certainly didn't intend, but you can see his sense of humor, and plenty of recognizable traits in the letters nonetheless. A fun read for a fan.

  • Emma
    2018-11-25 17:48

    *Disclaimer: I received an early copy of this book through Penguin's First to Read program.*I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I tend to really like stories told through correspondence, and even though we only saw one side of the conversation, I think it was a lively and interesting tale. I learned so much about a beloved author (Roald did SO MUCH STUFF before he became a writer that I never knew about!), and I thought it was an interesting dialogue on the era in which he grew up and lived most of his life. It was really enjoyable to watch him grow up and see how his relationship with his mother changed solely through letters.After reading this I felt as though I knew him better, and could definitely see the development of his writing from school boy joking to more mature storytelling (with an occasional joke about balls thrown in for the fun of it). I think that if you enjoyed Dahl's written works and want to know more about the method to his madness, I'd definitely give this a read!

  • April Harvey
    2018-11-30 19:56

    *I received an ARC from Penguin's First to Read in exchange for an honest review*I think like a lot of others my first introduction to Mr. Dahl came in the form of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I have almost all of his children's books but my favorite has always been Matilda.I now know that a large part of this story was actually based on his own experience at a boarding school. This book is all about the letters that Roald sent to his mother starting at age 9 when he was attending the school all the way through adulthood. I learned so much about this author. He did have a pretty sharp sense of humor but he also had quite the life. He even worked for the British Secret Service. The letters were all saved by his mother but there are none of her letters back included in the collection. I really enjoyed this book but I just wish we could have read her responses because she seemed like quite a character herself from the intro information provided by the author Donald Sturrock.

  • Matthew Barnes
    2018-12-07 14:12

    Really nice read. A must for Roald Dahl fans! Full review https://booksmjb.blogspot.com/2016/10...

  • Debbie Phillips
    2018-11-18 13:01

    I loved this book... it is about one of my favorite people. I love that Roald Dahl wrote to his mother all his life. Some of his life I already knew about from his two biographies. I was very interested in reading about his later life after the RAF when he was working in America for the British Embassy.I have one quote to share... it is about his mother... "Sophie Magdalene was a remarkable mother. She was calm. She stayed behind the scenes. She sought no public acknowledgement of the sacrifices she made for her family. Indeed it was not until Roald was an old man that he wrote about her directly - in Boy (1984) and Memories with Food at Gipsy House (1991). But from the beginning of Roald's writing career to the end, she was present in his fiction... She was a catalyst too-in ways she probably did not fully appreciate. As a young boy, Roald had been fired by her tales of Norse mystery and magic and by her gossipy love of human frailty and weakness. As he grew into adulthood, he sought to return the compliment, entertaining her with his own stories and observations. Sofie Magdalene was Roald's first audience, but she was also his unacknowledged inspiration to become a writer. One might say that Roald's own career as a storyteller begins in these letters."I hope I have that kind of influence on my own children.Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge prompt(s) –A book of letters

  • Sojourner
    2018-11-16 11:45

    The question that immediately came to mind was, what’s in a letter? And who is Roald Dahl that we should spend money to buy a book about his letters to his mother. Then I realized who he was. Roald Dahl was no ordinary guy. He was a hugely successful British novelist and writer of children’s books which have sold over 250 million copies worldwide. He is best remembered for the fabulous Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and also Matilda, which some have described as the best children’s books of all time.Love from Boy: Roald Dahl's Letters to His Mother by Donald Sturrock couldn't have come at a better time. It coincides with the celebration of Roald Dahl’s 100 birthday. Though it has been almost twenty-six years since his death in 1990, Roald continues to touch lives through his books. The collection of letters in the book offer valuable insights into the kind of person that he was both as a young boy and adult. Some of the letters are from his early school days while the last one was written in 1962, the year his mother died.

  • Sally
    2018-11-17 19:04

    A biography of the fascinating life of Roald Dahl, presented largely through his letters to his mother -- from a young boy in boarding school through his service in WWII, his professional career in diplomatic service and as a budding writer. There is so much more behind the man than his quirky literary characters. The letters provide insight into Dahl's unique personality and his honest and loving relationship with his mother and other family members. The narrative explanations accompanying the letters fill in the blanks with the relevant background. Highlights include his plane crash as a pilot during WWII, and his close relationships with celebrities (e.g., Walt Disney, FDR). A "must read" for Dahl fans.

  • Terry Clague
    2018-12-05 18:10

    Fascinating collection of letters from Roald Dahl to his mother which make for a partial biography of the legendary writer - made all the more intriguing by the one-sided nature and the relative lack of discussion of his written work. You do get a good sense of his storytelling developing and he name drops with the best of them owing to a remarkable stint in the US during the war in which he worked with Walt Disney and weekended with the Eisenhowers. In the same period he reported back on a few irritations of American life, including this on American radio which was/is "all advertisements... you get some hot swing music, then a smooth-voiced bastard comes on who says, 'do you have stomach trouble?"

  • Cheryl
    2018-12-12 14:54

    I am not particularly a fan of Roald Dahl's writing. His children's books sounded "wrong" to me in perspective and humor, but I realize that I am in the minority. This book of letters written to his mother from the time he was an unhappy boarding school student to decades later as a famous author were still fascinating. I marveled at how Dahl moved from being a rather ordinary boy to dining with President Roosevelt and marrying a movie star. His life was certainly marked by amazing highs and lows. The letters give insight into the British war effort, as well. Very interesting.

  • Claire Wright
    2018-12-04 17:09

    I was pretty disappointed with this book. I had hoped there would be more funny anecdotes from Roald's life but many of the letters were repetitive and mundane requests for things to be sent, questions about fruit and celebrity name dropping in later chapters. The editor's summary at the start of each chapter only serves to spoil any surprises that follow in the letters. A book that should never have seen the light of day I'm afraid.

  • Ross
    2018-11-14 13:03

    This book provided some great insight into a literary master Roald Dahl. The letters were descriptive and at times repetitive but communicated thoughts, feelings, and experiences in Dahl's life that may have influenced his own writing. Most of the letters take place during his days as a student at a boarding school in England and as a pilot in World War II. I was hoping there would be more about his literary career and creating the master pieces that bear his name.

  • Sawyer
    2018-11-19 13:59

    Alright, this might be a stretch but I really think that this book should be considered a YA book in spirit. This is, in essence, a book about a boy growing up, going to changes and learning to cope and navigate life and all of its challenges.This is a beautiful book from a beautiful and different time. I love Roald Dahl and I think that this book has something to teach everyone who reads it.

  • Jan
    2018-12-07 19:58

    Roald Dahl was a spy, ace fighter pilot, chocolate historian and medical inventor.He also wrote weekly letters to his mother and, unbeknown to Roald, she lovingly kept every single one of them.To eavesdrop on a son's letters to his mum is to witness Roald Dahl turning from a boy into a man, and finally becoming a writer.

  • Alison
    2018-11-15 16:13

    Having read both "Boy" & "Going Solo" I felt I knew quite a lot about Roald Dahl's life but this was definitely an extra insight. There was also a lot more about his time in America and the incredible range of people he met. It was also interesting to have the explanations in between 'chapters' putting into context the letters and the reason for their tone etc.

  • Christina
    2018-11-28 13:14

    Charming, sweet, honest letters to Roald's Mom. Here is a good review. Enjoy.https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...

  • Caroline Doab
    2018-12-03 16:56

    This is such an amazing view into Roald D'ahl's life. I implore any D'ahl fan to have a read of this, his letters to him mother are amazing and very detailed, and also give a great insight into his amazing life.

  • Kimmy
    2018-11-25 14:45

    From Mom. Adorbs. Always loving Roald Dahl more.

  • Juliet Mike
    2018-11-25 15:08

    Love the school days letters most, especially the anecdote from Repton about cooking a tin of soup on a Primus stove and having boiling peas pressure-sprayed all over the study walls.

  • Jesse
    2018-12-06 19:53

    This collection of letters from Roald Dahl to his mother is quite interesting, and shows his development into the master storyteller that he would become later in life.