Read January: A Woman Judge’s Season of Disillusion by Marie Corbett Online

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In lucid, compelling prose, January follows the deepening friendship of two powerful women during a pivotal time in their lives.Recently widowed, Anne Armstrong Gibson, founder of Wellspring Cancer Support Foundation, is in the terminal stages of her illness. While Anne prepares her young sons for life without her, the Honourable Marie Corbett provides comfort and supportIn lucid, compelling prose, January follows the deepening friendship of two powerful women during a pivotal time in their lives.Recently widowed, Anne Armstrong Gibson, founder of Wellspring Cancer Support Foundation, is in the terminal stages of her illness. While Anne prepares her young sons for life without her, the Honourable Marie Corbett provides comfort and support for her friend—a role as challenging and emotionally fraught as her work conducting sexual assault and international heroin trafficking trials in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.From hospital ward to courtroom, Marie confronts the limitations of the criminal justice system and comes to terms with Anne’s fate, propelling her to choose between civic duty and the life she truly wants.The Honourable MARIE CORBETT is a retired superior court trial judge.In her thirty-year career, she was a dedicated crusader for social justice and reform of environmental, family, and pension law. She was the first woman president of the Canadian Environmental Law Association, a member of the first Ontario Status of Women Council, and Vice-Chair of the Pension Commission of Ontario.Marie lives in her native Newfoundland and in Florida....

Title : January: A Woman Judge’s Season of Disillusion
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780994924810
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 504 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

January: A Woman Judge’s Season of Disillusion Reviews

  • Camille
    2018-12-04 18:41

    The book failed to deliver on its promise of disclosing how Ms. Corbett made the transition from the bench to a life that made her happy. The despair and pain that she felt while watching a close friend die of cancer was palpable. This part of the book was genuine. However, the mere recitation of the steps taken to gown for court, recitation of conversations with clerks, and extracts from courtroom testimony and/or submissions of counsel did not disclose the reasons for why this particular judge felt that it was necessary to give up a highly esteemed position on the bench. All judges have to do what she did in the course of her normal day, and all of them have lives outside of the courtroom which present difficult challenges at one point or another. Not all judges make the decision to leave the bench.I was disappointed by this book. The last paragraph of the book is set "3 years later" and Ms. Corbett states that she is "happy." I had thought that this memoir would have been devoted to the thoughts, insights and feelings that Ms. Corbett had between the time of the death of her friend and her decision to leave the bench. At no point in the memoir did Ms. Corbett explicitly state that she was going to leave the bench and why she had made the decision to do so.It would have been interesting to read about the reactions to her decision, the opinions, comments and/or advice that she received (assuming that those around her did provide these to her upon learning of her choice) in the lead up to her decision. It would also have been very interesting to learn about the process of stepping down from the bench rather than retiring from the bench in the normal course.I was disappointed that this book did not live up to the description that I had read about it. I'd been expecting an insight into how her time on the bench led this particular judge to leave. That element was missing, or it was far too subtle for me to grasp.

  • Hina Zephyr
    2018-11-21 17:48

    "I was coming to realize that doing what was worthwhile did not always sustain the doer."A moving account of the friendship between two successful women who bond over the course of one's illness. Both women, though hailing from different backgrounds, carved a blazing trail in the male-dominated judicial field. Marie Corbett dons her robes to preside over difficult hearings daily while managing to look after her dying friend with great tenderness as soon as she steps out of her official attire, bringing her milkshakes and giving her facials. Anne Gibson's resilience in the face of aggressively spreading cancer while setting up Wellspring for cancer care patients, arranging care for her elderly mother and keeping the family together is perhaps not as painful to read as her love for her boys.... Shown simply through the thoughtful weekly menus she instructs the housekeeper to prepare. One hopes, along with Marie Corbett, that Anne might survive but winces in pain at her worsening debilitating and painful condition. It was also an eye opener at the bias against women, even in the highest courts of Justice.

  • Sandra Oates
    2018-11-21 23:30

    I loved this book! It's a well written story about friendship, dying, living, and the decisions surrounding each. The commitment of a friend to care for her dying friend, while maintaining a normal life as a mother, wife, and a Superior Court Justice, is inspiring. I highly recommend this book.