Read Little Edens: Stories by Barbara Klein Moss Online

little-edens-stories

These eight magical stories address the Edenic spaces that people create in their lives and the serpents that subtly inhabit them. In "Rug Weaver" (selected for Best American Short Stories 2001) an Iranian rug dealer makes a paradise of his prison cell by weaving an elaborate rug in his mind. Grieving parents in the title story transfigure a luxury subdivision in southernThese eight magical stories address the Edenic spaces that people create in their lives and the serpents that subtly inhabit them. In "Rug Weaver" (selected for Best American Short Stories 2001) an Iranian rug dealer makes a paradise of his prison cell by weaving an elaborate rug in his mind. Grieving parents in the title story transfigure a luxury subdivision in southern California into a vision of heaven. And in the novella "The Palm Tree of Dilys Cathcart" an unlikely love story unfolds between an Orthodox Jewish butcher and a lonely English piano teacher, who discovers a hunger for intimacy and ritual as she helps the butcher transcribe the mysterious songs he hears in his head. These and other stories constitute an elegant and richly evocative collection about the complexities of worldly and spiritual desires. Reading group guide included....

Title : Little Edens: Stories
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393057126
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Little Edens: Stories Reviews

  • Kerry
    2018-10-16 19:43

    Barbara Klein Moss’s Little Edens is a collection of short stories. They are all connected by a common theme, that of people forming their own private, personal Gardens of Eden. Imagery and concepts from Genesis occur over and over again and it was fascinating to be on the lookout for how they would appear in each incarnation. Some stories caught my interest better than others. Some of my favorites included:The Rug Weaver, an old Jewish man meditates on a magnificent rug he wove in his mind while imprisoned by revolutionaries in Iran. This figmentary rug was a literal recreation of Eden and a meditation on the act of Creation and the nature of the Divine. Now, living out the end of his life in California with his son and American daughter in law he is uncomfortably aware of how innocent his daughter in law is, particularly how naked she is compared to the veiled, covered women of his homeland and how ignorant she is to the darker parts of life. Like the Serpent he wove into his garden, the old man contemplates how he could enlighten her and while the story leaves off with her innocence undisturbed, the reader is left with a sense of a coiled snake contemplating a woman, not with malice but awareness of how much he knows that she doesn’t.The theme of the Interpreters is a return to the pristine and unspoiled. A modern couple work and eventually live in a restored colonial village. He is a harsh, unyielding man whose only love is crafting intricate furniture. She is cast as the temptress who would lure him from both God and creation, a sort of Lilith figure who eventually plots her own voluntary expulsion from the Garden back into the world. December Birthday is a story about the daughter of two Holocaust survivors held in benevolent captivity by parents who fear change and who lovingly resist her desire to move out into the world and lose her innocence. And in the Palm Tree of Dilys Cathcart, an Orthodox Jewish man comes to an English piano teacher, seeking her help in transcribing divinely inspired music based on the different attributes of God. With each session, they are drawn together – he by sharing his revelations and the tribulations he is facing with a wife afflicted with MS and she by a longing for him and his world. I will admit that there were times, I was a little frustrated by how abruptly the stories ended. Not all of the tales had what I would call resolution but I am not sure if that was a failing of the story or just the nature of the short story medium. But overall, each of these stories were well worth my time in and of themselves. I enjoyed them and I found the theme to be a fascinating one, rich with imagery and symbolism and food for thought.

  • Judith
    2018-09-23 22:00

    Donated yto Union.