Read Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States, Enlarged Edition by Eleanor Flexner Ellen Fitzpatrick Online

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Century of Struggle tells the story of one of the great social movements in American history. The struggle for women's voting rights was one of the longest, most successful, and in some respects most radical challenges ever posed to the American system of electoral politics."The book you are about to read tells the story of one of the great social movements in American hisCentury of Struggle tells the story of one of the great social movements in American history. The struggle for women's voting rights was one of the longest, most successful, and in some respects most radical challenges ever posed to the American system of electoral politics."The book you are about to read tells the story of one of the great social movements in American history. The struggle for women's voting rights was one of the longest, most successful, and in some respects most radical challenges ever posed to the American system of electoral politics... It is difficult to imagine now a time when women were largely removed by custom, practice, and law from the formal political rights and responsibilities that supported and sustained the nation's young democracy... For sheer drama the suffrage movement has few equals in modern American political history."--From the Preface by Ellen Fitzpatrick...

Title : Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States, Enlarged Edition
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ISBN : 9780674106536
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 432 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States, Enlarged Edition Reviews

  • Book Riot Community
    2018-11-22 02:48

    Oh my gosh, so much I didn’t know! Why is the suffrage movement not taught in U.S. History classes?! I picked this out to read because my new idea for a novel takes place in the later years of the suffrage movement, and I knew I needed to research the time period. While I was familiar with the Seneca Falls convention (notably, several people I’ve talked to about this book had never heard of it!), I was completely ignorant about the vast majority of suffrage history. So many awesome women, and so many horrifyingly misogynistic trials to overcome. Flexner does an awesome job at research. If you’re worried about inclusivity, Flexner does address black women’s contribution to women’s suffrage, and also the racism that occurred within the movement. This is a must-read for anyone interested in learning more about the women’s suffrage movement in the United States.— Margaret Kingsburyfrom The Best Books We Read In March 2017: http://bookriot.com/2017/04/04/riot-r...

  • JaNel
    2018-11-18 22:53

    Favorite Quotes:"I am not going to question your opinion. I am not going to meddle with your beliefs. I am not going to dictate to you mine. All I say is examine, inquire, look into the nature of things. Search out the grounds of your opinions, the for and against. Know why you believe; Understand what you believe, and possess a reason for the faith that is in you." Frances Wright

  • Margaret
    2018-12-08 03:46

    Century of Struggle chronicles the woman's suffrage movement in the US from pre-Seneca Falls to when women finally won the vote, more than 70 years after the first woman's suffrage convention at Seneca Falls. Just to illustrate why books like this need to be read, I mentioned Seneca Falls to three or four people I know who asked what I was reading, and they had no idea why Seneca Falls was significant. They'd never heard of it. And it's no surprise. I've spent twenty years in the education system and minored in history, but I don't recall the woman's suffrage movement being discussed in a single class.While I did know about Seneca Falls before reading this (learned about it on my own), there was so much I didn't know, far more than what I did. I learned so much. I mean A LOT. The history of how women won the vote in the US is fraught with struggle and amazing women. It's absolutely fascinating, and people need to know about this history!

  • Terry
    2018-11-29 03:58

    This is an excellent history of the women's suffrage movement in the United States, focused on the period from 1820 to 1920. Flexner not only details myriad aspects of the Women's Rights Movement, she also discusses at length the additional problems faced by African-American women and women in the labor movement. This book was written in the 1950s with an update in 1975, so it only touches in the conclusion on the women's liberation movement beginning in the 1960s through the early effort to pass the ERA amendment to the constitution. The book addresses a long-time question I've had -- how come it took so long for women in the USA to get the right to vote? After women did so much to build this country and all their work and sacrifice in various wars (such as the Revolution War, Civil War, WW I), growing numbers of college educated women in the 19th century, women joining the workforce, etc., how can it be that women didn't receive the right to vote until well into the 20th century? Flexner gives these basic answers:1. Political - political machines and many politicians (who were all male)worried that if women got to vote, they'd form their own "women parties" and only vote for women candidates. Even when individual states gave women the right to vote (Wyoming was first) and this did not happen, it didn't allay their fears.2. Economic - powerful, well financed business interests wanted to maintain the status quo. Many changes were taking place in the late 19th and early 20th century that upset business interests and women voting rights was among those. The liquor/brewing industry, oil, banking and other big money industries surreptitiously financed anti-suffrage groups and lobbied legislatures around the country.3. Racial - Southern states were solidly against women's suffrage because they were against all African-Americans voting. The southern states were fearful that if women (including black women) got the right to vote, they might eventually be forced by the federal government to open voting to all citizens, not just whites. Southern poll taxes and other schemes effectively disenfranchised blacks until the Civil Rights movement of the 1960's and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Ten states never ratified the 19th Amendment -- all but Delaware were southern states of the old Confederacy. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of women's rights.

  • Rachel
    2018-11-22 21:49

    I loved learning more about the women's movement to gain the vote in this book. It was clearly excellently researched and full of fascinating information. I feel like I learned about more than history--politics, sociology, and media studies could easily be included in the topics touched on here.

  • Layna
    2018-11-22 02:00

    Eleanor Flexner provides a wonderful commentary about the figures and acts that made equality much more real to women. As a woman I'm always humbled by the courage and hard work that went into making this a society in which I can feel free to want my freedom. This book brings home that lesson.

  • Kate Tooley
    2018-11-30 01:43

    Very good overview, with enough personal notes to draw the reader in. Especially admired the determination of the author to include the racial aspect of the WRM and it's interplay with abolition. For the most part unflinching and comparatively objective. Aware of some glossing over, mostly of personally alienating factors but certainly to a lesser degree than most history books. Thoroughly enjoyed it, would reread.

  • S J
    2018-11-19 03:49

    I originally checked this book out from the library. After reading the 1st few chapters, I knew I needed to have a copy of my own. It took me a while to get through, but this is a book every woman--and the men who love them--should read.... And I'll tell you something else. The next time I enter the voting booth, I'll have a new sense of pride & honor as well.

  • kylajaclyn
    2018-11-28 19:59

    I had to read this for my U.S. Women's Activism class. It is quite informative and interesting. There are things I can now tell people about our struggle to vote that I didn't know before. A bit dry at times, but there are worse books out there. It helped to have discussion questions for every chapter.

  • June
    2018-12-15 00:40

    I took a class in 1974 and this was one of the texts. I pulled it from the shelf when my son was doing a paper in a gender studies class at Duke. I found a new look at this time in my life very enlightening.

  • Lisa
    2018-12-01 20:52

    This is the most comprehensive overview of the women's movement I've read. It is filled with information, yet still interesting to read. If I need to look up a fact on women's history, I often start with Flexner.

  • Hollyparsonnielsen333
    2018-12-08 20:01

    Awesome book! I've always wanted to learn about women's heritage in this country. It was extremely informative. I suggest it to everyone! There were so many things that I had no idea happened to women throughout history, and their fight for change, which has given me so many freedoms.

  • Sue
    2018-12-11 03:48

    This was the classic text of first wave feminism for almost 30 years (it was originally published in 1959). She begins before Seneca Falls (although she argues that the movement begins here) and goes through the passage of suffrage.

  • Miguel
    2018-11-28 00:38

    This book has alot of great info about womens history. At times it was hard keeping up with dates because they jump around alot from chapter to chapter, but overall a great book to read.

  • Alissa
    2018-12-03 21:56

    re-reading

  • John
    2018-11-24 21:59

    an interesting but mostly untold story. This should be Ken Burns next series

  • Beth
    2018-12-08 02:38

    Excellent book, made more interesting by Flexner's anticipating of most of the major themes of women's history.