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Award-winning author Rachel Thompson courageously confronts the topics of sexual abuse and suicide, love and healing, in her second nonfiction book of prose: Broken Places. The sequel to Rachel's first nonfiction book, Broken Pieces, Rachel bares her soul in essays, poems and prose, addressing life's most difficult topics with honesty. As you follow one woman's journey thrAward-winning author Rachel Thompson courageously confronts the topics of sexual abuse and suicide, love and healing, in her second nonfiction book of prose: Broken Places. The sequel to Rachel's first nonfiction book, Broken Pieces, Rachel bares her soul in essays, poems and prose, addressing life's most difficult topics with honesty. As you follow one woman's journey through the dark and into the light, you will find yourself forever changed. Rachel's first book in this series, Broken Pieces, has been a #1 best seller on Amazon (eBooks) on Women's Poetry and Abuse. Please note: this book discusses serious topics, and is intended for mature audiences only....

Title : Broken Places
Author :
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ISBN : 9781620156896
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 124 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Broken Places Reviews

  • Naomi Blackburn
    2018-12-11 19:11

    I have had the opportunity to read both, Broken Pieces and Broken Places, by abuse survivor, Rachel Thompson. Ms. Thompson delivers poignant, powerful and poetic essays on the impact of sexual abuse, in many forms, on the psyche of a young woman. In both, Ms. Thompson steps out of her normal style of humorous, sarcastic essays that she is known for to dig deep into her soul and write about painful occurrences in her life and how they continue to affect her. As someone who has known Ms. Thompson for several years in a professional setting, I have always been amazed by her aura. Broken Pieces and Broken Places give readers the insight behind this aura. Broken Places takes it one step further. Much more raw than its predecessor, Broken Pieces, written in a poetic format, allows a deeper reader experience. As a former counselor and addiction counselor, these books stood out to me as an excellent tool for utilization for clients undergoing the process of discovery of sexual abuse in a therapeutic setting to assist them in moving from victim to survivor. I have recommended this book to several counselors to use in with clients in a therapeutic context. **Please note that these books can be triggers for individuals who have undiagnosed traumatic events in the area of sexual abuse.

  • Dennis Sharpe
    2018-12-12 17:55

    Truly A Rare Find!When I finished reading Rachel Thompson's latest, Broken Places, I was quietly stunned. I thought about it... read it again... and then contemplated. I was moved.I think I went into the reading with expectations of almost a sequel (if you will) of her last book Broken Pieces. What I read was that, to a degree... but it was so much more. Let me repeat that, because it matters... so much more!You should read this. Not 'you should read this if..'. You... yes, you. You should read this.If you have read Broken Pieces (you're really only hurting yourself if you haven't) then it's worth noting that this book is a different but no less potent animal. Broken Pieces punches you in the face with raw force, propelling you across the room, where this work moves across you with a power that transports you... carries you... relocates you... in a way that most writing can't hope to achieve. Truly a rare find.All in all? Most definitely worth the read! Trust me. The writing is simply amazing, showing a level of skill and mastery of language that is sure to impress, but more so a grasp of what is felt - at once universally and personally.

  • Ben Ditmars
    2018-11-21 22:41

    Some poets are born, but most are made. I believe Rachel Thompson possesses an inner-strength transcending both ideals. Perhaps her poetry would not be possible without her story, but that is immaterial. She was born and makes a difference. I am not a survivor of sexual abuse, but I feel the intensity of her writing and the strength that it provides. There is courage in the ability to speak that I know others will find because of Broken Places. I better understand the enormity our actions and indifference can cause to victims of abuse. And I find solace in the truth and beauty of her words that touched my soul. If you like great writing or poetry, please give this book your time. It will be well worth it. Two of my favorite passages were:can a ghost of air and dusthold me now?It’s beautiful, this hill we climb To the quiet, most private silence of our souls

  • Tee loves Kyle Jacobson
    2018-12-06 18:53

    First I have to say that this book is not for the faint of hearts. It is raw and deals with a lot of issues such as depression, suicide, sexual abuse and other things.Rachel has taken something raw and made it a beautiful story of how one girl has survived a dark path to come into the light and heal. In poem and essay style Rachel weaves a dark past and things that happened to a girl that should not have happened and the path to healing.This is a must read for anyone who has ever been abused sexually or thought about suicide. This is an amazing true journey of taking something bad in life and turning it into something positive and inspirational.

  • Justin Bog
    2018-11-14 18:00

    Somehow more urgent and immediate than Broken Pieces, the writing (the language, the poetry) is better, and I loved Rachel Thompson's earlier book. Hitting the same emotional valley, trying to understand, failing, and succeeding, walking the walk, Thompson pulls dark blankets off of her past and reveals the ugliness of human nature. Her journey is startling, harrowing, and sad. Surviving and leaving a record for others to discover is brave. If you are a survivor of abuse, this book may become a touchstone.

  • Linda
    2018-11-27 18:56

    This was a hard read for me. It hit so close to home in areas that I thought I'd put way behind me. Now I know where the nightmares come from....Rachel Thompson took on a task that touches the heart in ways I've never read before. This book is extremely well written and told with such grace and feeling that you turn the pages and reach the end before you expect it. You can feel a little girls pain and fear. The poetry was beautiful and I don't usually read books with poetry in them. This one was pure art from beginning to end.How do you deal with a neighbor that you have to face every single day of your childhood after he has touched you inappropriately. When it seems everyone is watching every move you make. After you grow up the things that happen are still with you no matter how hard you try to hide it. The nightmares that wake you up in a cold sweat. Knowing you didn't deserve what happened but still blaming yourself in so many ways.I loved this book even though it made me cry for a childhood lost. It made me remember things that I had chosen to forget. Whether it's a neighbor, a family member or date rape or all three, you are not to blame. You are just an innocent child who had no control over the things that happen to you. You're suppose to be carefree, happy and enjoy your life. You are suppose to be protected. Sometimes the very ones who are suppose to protect us are abusers though. Sometimes they are not there for YOU and they do blame YOU when it's them that should be taking care of your pains and fears. Anyone who has ever been abused or molested or even if it has never happened to you, you should read this book and the first one: Broken Pieces. Both are great books and in so many ways help you understand that you are innocent or not to look down on anyone who has been hurt in such a terrible way.Rachel Thompson has written a heartfelt story that I could not stop reading even when I thought I could not read another word. It is such a touching story. Thank you for writing this. It helped!!!

  • Dennis Sharpe
    2018-12-10 19:11

    When I finished reading Rachel Thompson’s latest, Broken Places, I was quietly stunned. I thought about it... read it again... and then contemplated. I was moved. I think I went into the reading with expectations of almost a sequel (if you will) of her last book Broken Pieces. What I read was that, to a degree... but it was so much more. Let me repeat that, because it matters... so much more!You should read this. Not 'you should read this if..'. You... yes, you. You should read this. If you have read Broken Pieces (you're really only hurting yourself if you haven't) then it's worth noting that this book is a different but no less potent animal. Broken Pieces punches you in the face with raw force, propelling you across the room, where this work moves across you with a power that transports you... carries you... relocates you... in a way that most writing can't hope to achieve. Truly a rare find.All in all? Most definitely worth the read! Trust me. The writing is simply amazing, showing a level of skill and mastery of language that is sure to impress, but more so a grasp of what is felt - at once universally and personally.

  • Cardoza
    2018-11-20 19:53

    It is simply amazing that the author, Rachel Thompson, has used her past experience to help others. Broken Places is not a continuation from Broken Pieces but reading both books will provide you with lessons on dealing with the past and letting go of the pain. Both books are compilation of the author's feelings and opinions in the form of poetry or prose and eventually functions as a "manual" on your journey to healing. People pleasing, shame, guilt, anger, addiction and inability to move on become invisible obstacles in our own paths. Broken Places helps the reader to identify these obstacles and then deal with them. That's a key lesson in both of Rachel Thompson's books. You cannot move on without first dealing with the obstacles in your life. I applaud the author for using her words to reach out to the broken hearts and minds around her. Abuse survivors will be able to relate and appreciate this book without the sentiment that they are being judged. *****I received a free book from the author in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  • Justin Bog
    2018-11-30 23:51

    Somehow more urgent and immediate than Broken Pieces, the writing (the language, the poetry) is better, and I loved Rachel Thompson's earlier book. Hitting the same emotional valley, trying to understand, failing, and succeeding, walking the walk, Thompson pulls dark blankets off of her past and reveals the ugliness of human nature. Her journey is harrowing and sad. Surviving and leaving a record for others to discover is brave. If you are a survivor of abuse, this book may become a touchstone.

  • Hilary Grossman
    2018-12-11 23:09

    Broken Places was such a powerful and beautiful read and Rachel Thompson is so brave and strong for sharing her story so eloquently. Broken Places is one of those books that stays with you way after the last page is written. If you asked me before I read this book if I would enjoy poetry I would say no. But this book changed my mind. The way that poetry was used to convey messages and feelings was amazing

  • Jennifer Gilmour
    2018-11-27 16:59

    I read this after I had read Broken Pieces. It’s something that is close to home in reference to domestic abuse. I continued on to this in the aid to educate myself further. Rachel has put her scars onto paper here, I found this book harder to read then her previous in the series. It took me by surprise and I am not sure if this is because I am not familiar with this as an experience. I have to say I commend Rachel for this. Again you can read it in small chunks and it’s not a depressing read at all, thoughts, feelings and memories come into this piece of work. I believe many would relate to this and I would urge others to read it. It has certainly given me an insight into some of the signs of child abuse and just how constructive the perpetrators are.

  • Mariyam Hasnain
    2018-11-21 16:43

    Review follows shortly!

  • Chanticleer EditorialBook Reviews
    2018-11-21 19:58

    While the incidence* of childhood sexual abuse continues to grow, thankfully there are survivors like Rachel Thompson who have conquered the horror.In "Broken Places: A Memoir of Abuse", Thompson conveys the facts and feelings of being an 11-year-old at the hands of a trusted neighbor who turns out to be a pedophile. The book dutifully begins with a “Trigger Warning,” notifying abuse survivors that the subject matter could be painfully harsh.Through poems, prose, and reflective pieces written with candor and literary charm, she shares how she coped: retreating to her room surrounding herself with books and music, and feeding her already introverted personality. She rarely went out except to earn good grades or do chores. “Because if I did, I faced the glaring, accusatory stares of his wife and children—as if I were the one who committed such ghastly crimes.” Later, she drank, got high, and considered suicide.Not until her thirties, depressed, anxious, and following the birth of a daughter, Thompson sought therapy for the first time after a doctor’s visit left her with a PTSD diagnosis and a prescription for an anti-depressant. Therapy was “life-changing,” leading her to the realization that she, not her abuser, was in the driver’s seat of her recovery. “I love, I breathe, I work, I write, I live. What happened does not stop me.”Today, in her fifties, she is an advocate for sexual abuse survivors and runs the Twitter chat #SexAbuseChat. She owns a social media and book marketing company and previously wrote the essay collection "Broken Pieces, A Walk In The Snark" and the more humorous "The Mancode: Exposed".A talented writer with a journalism degree, Thompson adeptly plays with point of view employing both first person singular (“I”) to convey her experiences, and first person plural (“We”), perhaps to denote a kinship among survivors: “We are no longer whole—we are bits of cells made up of dread, and fear, and shame. We speak in terms that separate us from ourselves because even now, all these many years later, we don’t want to own what happened.”Also, she sneaks in literary gems, like alliteration: “The bad thing takes your brain hostage, fills it with the detritus of denial, becomes dead leaves waiting for the deep scratch of the rake.”The only weakness of Broken Places is its arrangement, as it seems like a random assortment rather than an intentioned story. Perhaps this organization, or lack thereof, speaks to the uncertainty Thompson faced during a time in her life that was more about second-guessing and doubting rather than chasing butterflies and riding bikes like little girls that age should be doing.Most importantly, the book is recommended reading for adults, college students, and youngsters alike as it serves as impetus for a much-needed culture shift—telling children that it’s okay to report abuse and for grown-ups to hear them.*1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse, according to the National Center for Victims of Crime.

  • Micki Peluso
    2018-11-14 23:52

    Broken PlacesByRachel ThompsonAuthor Rachel Thompson believes that the ever-present shame of child molestation drastically alters what a child’s life might have become. In her outstanding candid book, she suggests through education, often poignant essays and poems, just how devastating sexual abuse is—particularly to a child. It rips the psyche right down to the soul.She takes you on a journey through her own life from the time she was eleven years old and bears her ‘shame’ in an effort to help other sufferers. The author pulls no punches, exposing every shard of agony she endured; from guilt, humiliation, rage, hate and a yearning for vengeance. This book is not a ‘tell all’ but a sharing of what she’s learned as she changed from victim to survivor. One essay on forgiveness is an especially interesting outlook.Broken Places is not only a book for survivors but also for those who share their lives, helping them to more fully understand the depth of pain and myriad physical symptoms and emotions borne daily by their loved ones. Yet even vigilant adults having been scarred sexually and emotionally themselves can miss what’s happening to their children and loved ones. I missed it and knew what to watch for. Children will hide their shame because they believe it’s their fault. And often continue hiding throughout their lives—lives that might have turned out so differently.Each of the author’s essays address one issue and teaches the reader how to overcome the past horrors of their lives. There are some graphic scenes which may be upsetting but this well-written book by an author with excellent writing skills overcomes that by offering coping methods for the trauma of child molestation.Rachel Thompson brings readers into her own life wholly. She explains the crippling and strange symptoms that may happen years later to a survivor. Personally, I was amazed and shocked by incidents I thought I’d ‘let go.’ This is definitely a book that readers will refer to often. It’s a rare book that is capable of explaining so aptly, yet with fortitude and compassion, the lonely nightmare of childhood sexual abuse. This one of them.Those enjoying this book on so many diverse levels will want to check out Author Rachel Thompson’s award winning first ‘broken’ book, ‘Broken Pieces’ as well as her humorous books; ‘A Walk in the Snark,’ and her best selling, ‘Mancode.’Micki Peluso; author of . . . And the Whippoorwill Sang

  • TheBookishHobo
    2018-12-13 18:07

    Broken Places is so raw and real and poignant that it hurts in the most painful of ways. And you don’t have to be a survivor of sexual abuse to feel it. Because everyone can relate to the brutally honest emotions which have been bled out onto the page. Her stained canvas paints for us a story of strength and promise.Thompson’s words are the needle which inject us into her veins. And we float in the crimson river of her pain and heartache. And then she opens her heart and graciously and courageously invites us in. Exposes the most intimate part of herself to us.Broken Places is not something which is read. It is something we experience. And the experience is, I know, unique to all of us. Because each of us has lived a different life, and yet the same one. Because none of us is a stranger to pain. And Thompson, through her story, reminds us of this. She pulls our pain out of us. Makes it bubble to the surface. But the trigger is a beautiful reminder. A reminder of what all of us have been through. A reminder that, like her, we are all… survivors. And even more than that, that we are never alone. And even more than even that, that our story can (and will) help others.But the story isn’t like we are crawling inside of a deep and never-ending black tunnel, no. Even in the most painful of parts, there is something which glimmers off in the distance. Like a beautifully golden thread intricately weaved into a stunning tapestry, her soul, though no stranger to darkness, shines and sparkles. Her story a testament to strength. A reminder to all of us to never give up and to never let our tragic experiences define and cripple us. A reminder to keep living.Thompson is a beautiful writer. A beautiful human. She’s taken something ugly and done something beautiful – helped others. A person and author you want to know. A person and author you need to know.If I were to hope for any book to be read by all, this would be the one. The world needs real stories. Stories that hurt. Because in pain we grow. As people. As a society.After I turned the last page and my face was stained with tears, I whispered my first review to the author. It was a short one. And it is with these two words that I will end my review here…Thank you.

  • M.J. Payne
    2018-12-13 00:03

    “Broken Places” is an artistic fusion of poems, essays, prose and joined ponderings about the “fault lines that tremor and quake …aftershocks” when the “icy fingers “from the sudden stranglehold of childhood memories hover through a lifetime of dealing with abuse. Rachel Thompson quotes Einstein’s observation that the separation of past, present, and future are illusion and says this is why the mind throws flashbacks at us as we move back and forth between points of childhood trauma and ordinary thought. Rachel points out that the mind and nervous system have no concept of time as they sling past terrors into the present and our bodies respond as if currently under attack. Such are the slings and arrows of PTSD. Shame hides under behavior designed to free us even for a moment from the subconscious riptide. Hypervigilance, even in sleep is common for survivors who often suffer night terrors that seem impossible to tameIn poems like china tea cups thin to the point of transparency, Rachel leads the reader to emotionally shattering places. New delicately decorated cups appear with each poem as the story of Rachel’s child abuse unfolds. This well-written book reminds me of a garment embroidered with silk thread that gives slick texture and body to the story. The shards pile up as the tale of a shredded soul develops. Rachel teases the reader as she moves around the edges of her subject matter, arousing curiosity that she satisfies. The broken places seek each other and form in a healthier way as Rachel does repair work on her psyche. The brutalities of sexual assault are dealt with head on and with a deceptively delicate touch that will ambush the reader later with full meaning. Rachel, the weaver of garments of healing works at her loom so the reader can receive a personal cloak of restoration.“Broken Pieces” includes a valuable and possibly lifesaving array of organizations to help survivors.

  • Kevin Hammond
    2018-11-27 18:50

    And it is an important voice to listen to, but you have to be listening.When it comes to sexual abuse, which is sadly all too common, we hear a lot of voices on the subject. We hear voices from police departments and courts, concerned neighbors and finally the media projected voice of the heartless criminal who will go to jail, hopefully repent and learn a lesson.And that's a big feature of the way we think about the crime. We pay a lot of attention to all of those voices and justice being served, but to the voice of the victim? as with any crime really, that's buried somewhere in the white noise.there may be moments here and there where we get to hear that voice but somehow it isn't the loudest voice, or the one we are left with the strongest memory of. i know the author mentioned minimizing the crime and quietly hiding the shame and perhaps that's part of why. So this book tells an honest story about how there is a sentence that goes with being the victim but it may or may not ever end. The author courageously tackles the subject of forgiveness in a way i thought was genuine and not in keeping with the typical projected mode of how victims are encouraged to and expected to tow the line with the forgiveness bit.I believe that this is more in keeping with the voice we should be listening to. the voice that tells of the cost to the victim and the triggers, the memories and the personal troubles, and the lasting effects hanging around long after the crime. its this kind of voice we should be paying attention to

  • Drewseph
    2018-11-23 22:08

    Warning: Reading "Broken Pieces" will not prepare you for "Broken Places", but let me be clear: "Broken Pieces" is an amazing work of art, and "Broken Places" is even better. If you care for someone who has been sexually abused, you need to read this book. If you are someone who has experienced sexual abuse, you should read this book. Just know that it will be extremely painful but also wrap you in a warm, loving hug.Where "Broken Pieces" was sometimes shy and esoteric with some of the more painful topics, Rachel Thompson is not so protective with "Broken Places", especially with herself. This book should've taken me less than two hours to read, but it took me two days. I had to stop and re-read passages and even entire pieces. I had to take breaks because the pages were filled with so much power.Our details are so very different, but our emotional truth is exactly the same. She told that truth so exquisitely. It terrified me to read that truth and comforted me to share it with someone. I wanted Rachel to shut up and to scream even louder. I found myself hating her and loving her and feeling all these things all at once. "Broken Places" tore me apart and put me back together.Like Rachel Thompson, I refuse to hide from triggers. They are all around me anyway, and to deny them would be to deny myself and my right not to be ashamed for things that are not my fault. Rachel Thompson refuses to live in that shame, and she's helping me to do the same.

  • Casey Sheridan
    2018-12-10 20:10

    As always, Rachel's work is powerful, her words filled with so much emotion, her strength always there.As a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, reading Rachel's words was difficult. They not only conjured up the shadows of my memories, but they made me ache for the little girl that was once Rachel.I want to quote a paragraph from Broken Places that struck me and resonates deeply with my own experience with abuse, something I still struggle with."What did I learn from my abuse? Not to trust. That I was alone, truly alone. That nobody would really ever protect me but me. That words carry meaning, but actions mean more. I held tight to the belief that I was alone." (Still true for me)Reading Rachel's words above made me realize I'm not all that alone. Logically, I know I'm not the only one that deals with trust issues. Many people do whether it's from abuse or something else. But on so many other levels, I feel alone in this.Inside there's still a little girl wanting someone to protect her, but knowing it will never happen. On the outside is a grown woman that feels the same way.Thank you, Rachel, for writing your books. From one survivor to another (hug) (hug) (hug) (hug) with a few tears thrown in.I highly recommend you read Rachel's books, Broken Pieces and Broken Places. Have boxes of tissue handy.

  • Raven Haired Girl
    2018-11-26 18:44

    Rachel Thompson spills her soul through her powerful and affecting essays and poetry of her childhood sexual abuse, as well as of her abuser which happened to be her next door neighbor. Rachel’s horrific event molded and shaped her into the strong woman she is as well as the talented writer she is today. She writes with abandonment, bearing her soul in such a raw manner, her courage admired. Her words are visceral, compelling. As a survivor of abuse her words conveyed what’s been muted in many heart and souls, eclipsed by shame and guilt. A voice for those speechless, or those unable to reveal their pain through words written or spoken.Rachel imparts the lingering damage the hideous actions a monster leaves behind the moment innocence is stolen. Your life is altered forever as you desperately sift through the wreckage hopeful you’ll be able to mend the many minute fractures. Rachel’s courage, strength and resilience is an example and a beacon of hope for other survivors dealing with the scars of abuse.Bold writings on a taboo topic plaguing too many children, examining havocs aftermath.Visit Raven Haired Girl for more reviews & giveaways

  • Thomas Muriuki
    2018-11-30 20:02

    It's not everyday I read memoirs, but this one is special in some way. Insightful, honest and pragmatic!Rachel had gone deep down the emotional construct and given the very raw truth and reality of what Childhood Sexual Abuse really is.Her straightforward approach interwoven with poetic expression also offers an instrumental didactic hand to a survivor of CSA.Although suggestive in a personal perspective; the volume of raw emotion and practical challenges and pain are a voice to a person/survivorin the same or related abuse.This book is simply an invaluable voice to awaken other survivors and uphold their dignity and live their true self amid the emotional and mental burden that abuse has on a CSA survivor.At times, I had to pause and process the very raw truth and challenging experience that Rachel draws from her personal life.It is no doubt a CSA survivor will find this book useful and an endearing voice to give up shame and find the sense of worth in who they are despite the stigma that is associated with CSA.

  • Allie Burke
    2018-12-10 00:08

    I've been following Thompson's writing through blogs and social media for years, but nothing could have prepared me for the stunning voice this author has. I'm not much of a poetry reader. Though my favorite genre is Literary, I'm definitely one of those numbskulls that just doesn't get it. I want to read a story, not words. Thompson brings a rare talent, a gift, to tell a gorgeous story with lines of poetry each woven together with a dark ribbon with gold hope sparkling off its edges. Broken Places produces some of the most beautiful writing I have ever, ever seen. Her style cuts into your heart with a knife that is not only sharpened but ragged, its tip on fire. If you can get past the triggers of sexual abuse, it will swallow you with the brutal truth it bleeds all over the page. It takes a grand ability to write short non-fiction with emotional potency and raw effect like this, but Thompson nails it. I would recommend it to any fan of artistic literature. **OCH received a copy of this e-book in exchange for an honest review.

  • Mary Rowen
    2018-12-10 19:05

    This book...wow. Where to begin? It's simply stunning in its ability to do so many things so well. It chronicles the horrific tragedy of sexual abuse of children, while also giving the reader hope on every page. Much of Broken Places is about the sadness and emptiness that happens after abuse, but parts of it are also a celebration of healthy love and sexuality.I believe it's an important read for everyone. If you're a survivor yourself--and can handle reading about the topic--it may help you to heal. If you know nothing about childhood sexual abuse, this book will help you understand the pain survivors experience. And if you, like me, have a very close friend who was molested repeatedly as a child, this book may help you to understand your friend better. I found parts of it difficult to read--especially as the mother of a 13 year old girl--but I'm glad I did and recommend it highly.

  • Elite Indie
    2018-11-19 21:58

    Rachel Thompson delves into some raw corners in Broken Places, but she also manages to dig up a lot of hope. The mixture of poetry, narrative and prose balance the book nicely, making it not quite memoir, not quite poetry book, and all perfectly balanced. There were some moments in this book that struck a cord deep inside, something only the best poetry can do. "Arousal feels like shame, so she must be broken (Rachel Thompson, Broken Places)." Anyone who has ever had to bear the burden of an abuse knows the power of this phrase. There are many more instances of beauty, desperation and anger in this book. It is literature that's honestly written, unashamed and refreshing. Thompson decides that taboo topics need light the most, and she shines her light on some dark places. There may be triggers for abuse survivors, but perhaps not. Instead, I found solace and comfort in a book that understands my pain and strength. I think others will, too.

  • Stephanie Ortez
    2018-11-26 18:04

    I have the pleasure to read both Broken Pieces and Broken Places. Rachel's poetry is raw and powerful. While it is hard to discuss or read around the topic of sexual abuse, there is something profoundly consoling about this book. I appreciate the introduction surrounded the mind, body, soul, and dealing with feelings of shame and denial. Rachel's poems not only manage a difficult subject; they also make something new of it. For example: "Survivors create survival mechanisms. Mine is pushing through. I push everything to the side, out of my line of vision, out of my mind and I focus relentlessly on my goal." The grandeur of these lines awakes the fighter within sexual abuse survivors. However alone or alienated we feel about our own abuses, our lives can be changed. Rachel has certainly changed mine.

  • Linnea
    2018-12-04 23:05

    Broken Places is vulnerable, visceral and powerful. Rachel has exposed herself and shared her most painful places in order to help others heal and reduce the stigma and shame of childhood sexual abuse. Brene Brown states: “Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy... Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” Rachel has embraced her vulnerabilities and displays her immense courage in this beautiful book. She doesn't share a chronology of her abuse, but rather her writing actually evokes feelings in the reader so that the reader goes on a journey alongside her. Thank you for sharing your light Rachel.

  • Will Van Stone Jr
    2018-11-18 20:43

    Another powerful story from Rachel ThompsonMuch like Broken Pieces, Places is a fractured collection of personal essays and poetry focused primarily on the childhood sexual abuse she suffered though time is spent on the dissolution of one adult relationship and the hopeful dreams of another. Be forewarned, there may be parts that are difficult for some to read but those parts are the most important portions; they are what allow us into the author's deepest recesses and allow an understanding of what csa can do to a person.Though less angry than Pieces, Places brings more sadness; instead of casting hate at the cretin who abused her, she's showing more of the depression that the heinous acts created - that she didn't even realize at the time.Stop reading this review already and just buy the damn thing.

  • Roe
    2018-12-05 23:02

    Broken Places: A Memoir of Abuse by Rachel Thompson is a nonfiction book of poetry, essays, and prose. Her writings, as a survivor of childhood abuse, are very emotional and comes from a depth so deep that the reader cannot but experience these feelings along with her. For example, when the author writes about her "Silence "...a time of innocence and lost...the reader feels the threatening pressure of the abuser's gun that stood for two frightening words, "don't tell". Her silence was a given, her family must be safe. Throughout the book, the author conveys strength and a determination to stay strong while exposing raw emotions to share with her reader. Her words and emotions convey that she is ultimately a survivor. I was given a complimentary copy for an honest review.

  • Will Van Stone Jr
    2018-12-11 00:49

    Much like Broken Pieces, Places is a fractured collection of personal essays and poetry focused primarily on the childhood sexual abuse she suffered though time is spent on the dissolution of one adult relationship and the hopeful dreams of another. Be forewarned, there may be parts that are difficult for some to read but those parts are the most important portions; they are what allow us into the author's deepest recesses and allow an understanding of what csa can do to a person.Though less angry than Pieces, Places brings more sadness; instead of casting hate at the cretin who abused her, she's showing more of the depression that the heinous acts created - that she didn't even realize at the time.Stop reading this review already and just buy the damn thing

  • Stephanie BwaBwa
    2018-11-26 17:55

    Broken Places was undoubtedly moving, emotional and telling. Rachel peels back the veil of her life and dramatically reveals what took place in the most raw way possible. Her essays and poems make you feel her journey and torment, whether you are able to relate or not. With brevity, simplicity and depth, Rachel uses her writings to show how she went from victim to survivor and how each and everyday she still walks the path of healing and wholeness. Broken Places is heavy but beautiful. Telling but necessary. A hard truth to face but a truth with the power to cause a revolution for change. As Rachel so eloquently wrote, "Words can draw blood if you're very, very careful." In my case, it drew soul. Thank you for this work Rachel.