Read Melancology: Black Metal Theory and Ecology by Scott Wilson Online

melancology-black-metal-theory-and-ecology

Melancology addresses the notorious musical genre black metal as a negative form of environmental writing that blackens the cosmos. This book conjures a new word and concept that conjoins black and ecology: melancology, a word in which can be heard the melancholy affect appropriate to the conjunction. Black metal resounds from the abyss and it is precisely only in relationMelancology addresses the notorious musical genre black metal as a negative form of environmental writing that blackens the cosmos. This book conjures a new word and concept that conjoins black and ecology: melancology, a word in which can be heard the melancholy affect appropriate to the conjunction. Black metal resounds from the abyss and it is precisely only in relation to its sonic forces that the question of intervention in the environment arises in the articulation of melancology with ethics. That is, in deciding which way out we should take, in deciding with what surpluses to dwell, with what waste, what detritus or decay in a process of unbinding with sonic forces that traverse an earth choking in wealth and death. The book thus provides a provocative and challenging contribution both to popular and intellectual debates on ecology."...

Title : Melancology: Black Metal Theory and Ecology
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781780991894
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 255 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Melancology: Black Metal Theory and Ecology Reviews

  • Katrin
    2018-09-18 20:22

    black metal theory is for me at least interesting enough. I don't want to start arguing if it has a right to exist and if it makes sense in the broader scheme. but some essays are definitely worth a read and putting a musical style, but also an art form into context. is that necessary? i guess no, but i see how black metal fascinates a lot of people, who also try to understand it, even if maybe that is a futile endeavour. some essays were really good. i liked the ones about black sun, black blood, green and blackening, as well as the piece mostly on satyricon, to the mountains. there were some pieces that i understand much less. the one about the image of the fly had almost nothing to do with black metal, as well as the too eccentric piece on worms. i did not agree with the essay arguing that nature is not the escape-form for black metal and that true black metal obviously is born out of the secluding and emotionally draining loneliness inside a big city. to me, black metal is not only the norwegian landscape. there is so much that can influence, create and shape black metal, from the scorching heat on a deserted plain on a windswept greek island, to an anonymous multi-storey building in which people merely exist and live in their own isolation, to the snow-capped trees in a vast Finnish wintry forest or inside an ancient ruined welsh castle, surrounded by seemingly endless green hills, echoing the wind like laments for times past. all this, all this can be black metal.

  • Ben Cullimore
    2018-09-25 22:01

    It is unsurprising that "black metal theory" has been met with vehement scorn in certain sections of the black metal community. Condemned as "pseudo-hipster bullshit" that, at best, misses the point entirely and, at worst, destroys the beautiful mystery surrounding what is a fascinating cultural movement, attempts to delve into the philosophy and ideology behind black metal have, thus far, largely failed to hit the mark.Melancology: Black Metal Theory and Ecology is one of the latest such offerings, and whilst it includes several disappointing elements, it nonetheless comes close to shedding new and interesting light on a contentious and often misunderstood genre of music. Unlike many other examples of black metal theory, the book (a collection of fourteen essays edited by Professor Scott Wilson of Kingston University) certainly attempts to examine the genre from an interesting angle, describing it as a "strange form of environmental writing that 'blackens' or addresses a 'blackened' cosmos". From this, Wilson has derived the term "melancology" - a portmanteau of "melancholy" and "ecology" - which guides each of the book's individual essays.Particularly interesting are the pieces provided by Drew Daniel, Dominik Irtenkauf, and Eugene Thacker, with the latter two being the book's standout and most thought-provoking essays. However, too often, many of the contributions get lost in a haze of academic buffoonery and drift away from the premise of the book, which, at its core, is a worthwhile endeavour. Nonetheless, the hope is that Melancology: Black Metal Theory and Ecology encourages further, and better, discussion on a subject that could, if executed properly, shed light on what is a fascinating movement worthy of close examination.

  • Court Hansen
    2018-10-17 00:11

    This was very interesting, but I'd be lying if I said I understood all of it. Like many things that Zero Books have put out, it requires a pretty solid foundation in the different subjects it covers. Unlike the more popular "_________ and Philosophy," which can often have interesting deep reads of pop culture but frequently feel more like a Buzzfeed article, Melancology draws extensively from not only philosophy, but art criticism, ecology, and of course, black metal, one of the most obtuse musical subgenres out there. I did my best to keep up with this book and I like to think I at least partially succeeded, so if you're a black metal fan and you're up for the challenge, I recommend taking a crack at this book.

  • Terence
    2018-09-30 20:01

    My work was featured in Amelia Ishmael's essay, but I also enjoyed Drew Daniel, Eugene Thacker and Nicola Masciandaro's pieces. A thoughtful compilation.