Read the world more or less by Jean Rouaud Online

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Jean Rouaud's power to evoke the past is incandescent. His first two universally acclaimed novels, Fields of Glory ("Remarkable" -- New York Times; "Irresistible" -- Boston Globe) and Of illustrious Men ("Amazing" -- Philadelphia Inquirer; "A lovingly written book" -- New York Times), proved he was a worthy successor to the mantle of Proust. The first was an elegy to his gJean Rouaud's power to evoke the past is incandescent. His first two universally acclaimed novels, Fields of Glory ("Remarkable" -- New York Times; "Irresistible" -- Boston Globe) and Of illustrious Men ("Amazing" -- Philadelphia Inquirer; "A lovingly written book" -- New York Times), proved he was a worthy successor to the mantle of Proust. The first was an elegy to his grandfather and to the tragic ironies of World War I heroism; the second an elegy to his father, an ordinary man thrown into the extraordinary chaos of World War II. The World, More or Less is a portrait of the writer as a young man: myopic, dreamy, lonely, still grieving the deaths of his father and grandfather and seeking for a way to bring the confusions of adolescent life into focus. His nearsightedness gives him double vision: closing one eye brings clarity, closing the other blurs. Sharing this more-or-less world are Theo and Gyf, lover and friend, one far whom life is mystery, the other who wants to frame it in a camera lens. A crass between The Catcher in the Rye and Flaubert's Sentimental Education, The World, More or Less is a haunting story about growing up....

Title : the world more or less
Author :
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ISBN : 19776705
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 155 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the world more or less Reviews

  • Cooper Renner
    2018-11-03 19:49

    Early on I was reminded of WG Sebald as I read Rouaud, probably first in Fields of Glory, though Rouaud is more "focused"/limited in scope (and funnier). I'm not sure exactly when the thought occurred to me--if it was during my reading of Of Illustrious Men, or only early in the this title, the third in the "trilogy"--Rouaud was reminding me not just of Sebald, a kind of high seriousness, but also of Gordon Lish, a kind of garrulousness that arced toward humor, but was more an affect of a sort of roundabout way of zeroing in on his topic. Strange "parents," Sebald and Lish, but I think the metaphor is valid. This is the most focused, in character, of Rouaud's trilogy--keyed in as it is to the narrator's adolescence and young adulthood--but in approach is more like Fields than Illustrious, jumping around in time and setting and daring the reader to get lost.