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A serial killer is targeting London literary agents. Led by the old-fashioned and slobbish 'Inspector No' and aided by crime author Lavinia Lenehan, DS Flick Fortune and DC Bagawath Chandavarkar narrow down their suspects, all entrants in the Debut Dagger crime writing competition. The body count continues to rise as the story reaches its climax at an historic Scottish beaA serial killer is targeting London literary agents. Led by the old-fashioned and slobbish 'Inspector No' and aided by crime author Lavinia Lenehan, DS Flick Fortune and DC Bagawath Chandavarkar narrow down their suspects, all entrants in the Debut Dagger crime writing competition. The body count continues to rise as the story reaches its climax at an historic Scottish beauty spot, The Soldier's Leap....

Title : murder on page one
Author :
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ISBN : 16107759
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 305 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

murder on page one Reviews

  • Abigail Bok
    2018-11-16 19:33

    Murder on Page One is the debut mystery by Ian Simpson, retired from his work as counsel for the defense and later judge in the British court system. He therefore brings to his fiction extensive experience with police inspectors, perps, and innocent suspects. You feel the realism of his scenarios and characters.The story is told (as usual) from the point of view of the detectives, who in this case are faced with a string of murders, all the victims being literary agents. (There’s a true-to-life feel here, too: on every page describing rejections and arbitrary demands from these would-be experts in the publishing field, you can sense the seething frustration of an aspiring writer—not that Mr. Simpson has much to worry about, since he was published by one of the biggest crime imprints!)The internal office politics of the cop shop are rendered in detail, and we learn a lot about how literary agencies and writing contests are managed. The writing is punchy and clever (though I was occasionally baffled by the contemporary British slang). The reader is drawn into these worlds and pulled along with the vicissitudes of the tale: Are the murders committed by one person, or several? Will one detective be caught ignoring the true murderer for political reasons? Will there be another victim before the crime is unraveled? And the crimes are imaginative and clever, yielding few clues.My one critique might be that I could have used a spreadsheet to keep track of all the characters. Reading this story in ebook format, I kept missing the ability to leaf back through the pages and remind myself about which suspect was which, even where each police officer fell in the hierarchy. In this case reality, with all its complex messiness, could have been forfeit for a little novelistic streamlining to the tale’s benefit.Nevertheless, I give this book full marks for baffling me till the (largely plausible) end. Perhaps because I was trying to keep everyone straight, I did not see either the perpetrator(s) or the solver of the crimes coming. Mr. Simpson led me a merry dance and left me satisfied!

  • Jackson Burnett
    2018-11-29 22:43

    If you enjoy British mysteries, droll humor, and delightful characters, you should read Murder on Page One. Author Ian Simpson has accomplished a rarity. A Scottish lawyer and judge by trade and training, Simpson has written a crime novel that doesn't feel like it was written by a lawyer and a judge.The book avoids the use of a central character, much to the author's credit. Instead, the readers get to attempt to solve this mystery through the viewpoints of Detective Inspector Osborne, a veteran of the old school who may have the itchiest crotch in all fiction, Sergeant Fortune who generally avoids her "cast iron knickers" routine, and Constable Bagawath Chandavarkar, a young East Indian trying to make his mark. Simpson's use of multiple viewpoints is a welcome variation and the author handles it with sure-handed deftness.Murder on Page One is not perfect. The number of victims, suspects, informants, and police officers seem to unnecessarily confuse the plot and limit character development. Take a look at Richard Latham's review here at Goodreads. I agree with it. Considering that fiction writing is a second career for Simpson, Murder on Page One is more than an admirable effort. It's an enjoyable and fine novel. Regarding the rating: Murder on Page One falls into the same class as Agatha Christie and Perry Mason novels. Almost all of these novels I've read, I've rated four stars. I've really struggled with the rating here because although I liked the book very much, the confusion in the plotting and lack of character development keeps the novel from being on the same class as the Mason and Christie books.Still, I have no hesitation to recommend the book to mystery lovers and to those who like to chuckle when they read. Simpson's next book will certainly be a complete literary killer.

  • Jean Brodie
    2018-11-18 23:57

    I read this because his later novels have some local interest for me, and I wanted to start with the first to find out who the characters were. This was readable but there seemed to be an awful lot of characters (police, victims and suspects) and I found it a bit confusing trying to keep track of who was who.

  • Richard
    2018-11-18 19:33

    Clever and wicked plot, especially for a debut author. A serial killer/an aspiring writer, let down and rejected by several literary agents takes revenge by bumping them off; (reminded me of a great old film - Theatre of Blood).The book is written with great humour; in-jokes and with a very modern outlook.I wonder if the author had so many wonderful ideas; death scenarios and characters running through his head that he perhaps over complicated matters. The reader will forgive himof course by the end of the novel but as a result of too many victims, suspects and detectives, the book didn't fully get going for the first 100 or so pages. All those pages are needed to carry the expanded story and contain so quality scenes but I feel some revision in the early chapters would have made for a better book.From Chapter 11 the story is less inhibited and rattles along with growing confidence and by its conclusion the reader will be googling the author, searching for more books to read.Ian Simpson hasn't just arrived with this book he has re-defined part of detective fiction.This is a fine book; hopefully not a stand alone novel.The plot is complex but intelligently brought together; perhaps more character development could of been developed in the final week-end in Scotland, the pages may have been written and lost in editing.None of this should distract from an excellent book. Ian writes with real skill and charm. I trust we will not have long to wait for a sequel and literary agents forgive his comic insights into the world of publishing and crime fiction.